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Be alert for signs of Equine Gastric Ulceration Syndrome says Zoetis

Be alert for signs of Equine Gastric Ulceration Syndrome says Zoetis

London, UK, 27 September 2016 – Equine Gastric Ulceration Syndrome (EGUS) can affect any type of horse or foal in any environment. If your horse is displaying any unusual signs such as poor appetite, body condition and performance, changes in attitude or acute, recurrent colic it’s important to speak to your vet immediately, advises Zoetis vet Dr Wendy Talbot.

Equine Gastric Ulceration Syndrome (EGUS) is a serious and common condition,1,2 with approximately 93%of racehorses, 65% of performance horses, 54% of leisure horses and 50% of foals shown to be affected.2,3,4 The condition is associated with injury to the inner lining of the oesophagus, stomach and upper part of the intestine.2

Horses produce a steady flow of stomach acid to help digestion.1As a protective mechanism their naturally acidic stomach contents are buffered by alkaline saliva produced in response to regular eating and by the food itself.2 Our domestication of horses, particularly stabling and restriction of grazing, has reduced the time our horses spend eating, resulting in prolonged periods when the stomach is empty, causing reduced production of saliva. In addition feeding grain (rather than fibre) can produce types of acid which contribute to the already acidic environment of the stomach.1

The usual signs of EGUS may include poor appetite, poor body condition, poor performance, changes in attitude and acute and recurrent colic. In adult horses clinical signs may appear or progress as training intensity, speed and workload increase.2 However, in some horses the signs may be vague. In foals the signs may be very subtle and progress rapidly so it is important to contact your vet immediately if you have any concerns.2

There are many risk factors that may cause your horse or foal to suffer from gastric ulcers. These include stress, intense exercise, a high-grain diet, intermittent feeding, inappropriate management and other illnesses.1,2,4 The only accurate way to definitively diagnose or monitor EGUS is by gastroscopy,1 which involves a vet examining your horse’s oesophagus, stomach and upper part of the intestine using a gastroscope.

Wendy Talbot, vet at Zoetis, said: “EGUS is a serious condition but once diagnosed it can usually be treated very effectively with management changes and orally administered therapy to help the ulcers heal. If you think your horse could be suffering from EGUS you must contact your vet immediately.”

 

References

1 Bell RJ, et al. Equine gastric ulcer syndrome in adult horses: a review. NZ Vet J 2007; 55 (1): 1-12. 2 Picavet M-Th. EQUINE GASTRIC ULCER SYNDROME. Proceedings of the First European Equine Nutrition & Health Congress. February 9 2002. Antwerp Zoo, Belgium.. 3. Murray MJ, et al. Prevalence of gastric lesions in foals without signs of gastric disease: an endoscopic survey. Equine Vet J 1990; 22(1): 6-8. 4. Sykes BW, et al. European College of Equine Internal Medicine Consensus Statement—Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome in Adult Horses.J Vet Intern Med 2015;29:1288–1299

 

 

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